Documents needed to sell your property in Spain

You have decided to list your property for sale. Now you are probably wondering “what documents do I need to list my house? And once we have a buyer, what documents will I need when we go to the notary?” Here is a quick list of the documents you want to start compiling. Don’t panic if you are missing some of these. Gran Alacant Properties can help. Call us at +34 966 699 441  or stop by our office in the Carabassi Center

Documents needed to list your property for sale/complete at notary

Escritura

We need to see the escritura (the deed) of the house. At this stage, it doesn’t have to be an original. A copy is sufficient to list the house. If you don’t have the deed, we may be able to request a copy of the nota simple, a summary from the land registry.

NIE

We will need your foreigner’s id number to list. The number is sufficient to list but please note that when it is time to sign the notary may want the original documents.

Passport

We will need a copy of your passport.If the house was purchased with an old passport, a copy of this would be helpful as well as the notary may want to see this when you go to issue the new deed.

Electric

We need a copy of your electric bill or a receipt from the bank. The most important piece of information is the contract number. This is probably issued by Iberdrola but there are some other electric companies. If you have upgraded the wattage to your house (potencia), we will need a copy of the boletin (certificate) from the electrician

Water bill

When you go to list the house for sale, we will need a copy of your water bill or a receipt from the bank. The most important piece of information is the contract number.

Gas bill

If you have city gas installed, we will need a copy of your bill or a receipt from the bank. The most important piece of information is the contract number.

Community of owners

We need the contact information for the community of owners and a recent bill or receipt from the bank. If there are any derramas (special assessments) planned, we need to know about that. If you have a copy of the community bylaws that would also be helpful.

IBI

We will need a copy of your most recent IBI (council tax) bill. People often refer to this as the SUMA, the agency that collects payment on behalf of the tax authority.

Basuras

We will also need another bill issued by SUMA, the basuras (rubbish collection).

Cedula de habitabilidad

We will need a copy of your cedula de habitabilidad (habitation certificate). This is sometimes also called the licencia de primera occupacion. Given the age of your property, this is probably expired. When we find you a buyer, one of the things that will happen in preparation for the notary is the renewal or application of the new one in the buyers name.

Lawyer’s contact information

We will need the contact details for your local abogado or gestor to coordinate with them. This is especially important if your legal representative is from out of the area as different parts of Spain do things differently and talking in advance will help avoid problems down the line.

Building permits

If you have done any major work on the house (extensions, major remodelling, pool, etc) we will need to copies of building permits or licenses. If you do not have, we may be able to request a certificate of no infraction or antiquity from the town planning department.

Energy certificate

Certificado de eficiencia energetica (CEE) or energy certificate is a requirement to sell or rent any property in Spain. An architect or engineer completes a survey and the property is given a rating, A+ being the best, similar to the ratings on white goods. This is one of the documents the notary will expect when you go to sign. If you don’t have a CEE, Gran Alacant Properties can arrange to have this done for you.

Disclaimer: The information above is provided by Gran Alacant Properties for general informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed abogado or solicitor.  Always consult an independent solicitor.

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